Research: Exercise Physiology

Our faculty research interests cover a broad range of areas, from exercise epidemiology to genetic and molecular aspects of aging and exercise physiology. A number of our faculty are incorporating cutting-edge genetic, molecular, and cellular techniques into their studies of skeletal muscle, cardiovascular physiology, and metabolism. Graduate teaching assistantships, research assistantships, and fellowships are available for outstanding students, including an NIH/NIA-funded Institutional Predoctoral Training Grant (T32). We are looking for excellent and highly motivated graduate students to apply to our program and join our research teams. Our admission requirements are at least a 3.0 GPA, strong GRE scores, and excellent recommendations.

Click here to download the Exercise Physiology Brochure.

The Exercise Physiology Laboratory is comprised of several laboratories:

Together, these labs study the muscular, cardiovascular and metabolic aspects of physical activity and exercise training. Our faculty specialize in a number of areas, including strength training, aerobic training, cardiovascular disease risk, sarcopenia, epidemiology, genetics, metabolic disease risk, molecular biology, etc.

Visit individual faculty member pages and lab pages for more information about specific research interests and on-going projects.

Faculty Research Interests:

Chin, Eva R

Assistant Professor, Kinesiology

email website

(301) 405-2478
2134B SPH Bldg

Research Focus : Molecular Aspects of Exercise

Research Summary : Dr. Eva Chin is an Assistant Professor in Kinesiology. She received her PhD in Kinesiology at the University of Waterloo in Canada and then completed postdoctoral fellowships in Physiology at the University of Sydney in Australia and in Molecular Cardiology at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. Prior to coming to the University of Maryland Dr. Chin worked for Pfizer Global Research & Development as a Principle Scientist in the Frailty and Diabetes therapeutic areas. She then became an Associate Director working with teams on early stage clinical trials for novel Obesity and Osteoporosis drugs. Dr. Chin's research emphasis is on calcium signaling in skeletal muscle and the role that calcium plays in both maintaining muscle force output and regulating muscle gene expression. By understanding how calcium signals in skeletal muscle, this research may help in optimizing exercise and drug prescriptions for treating age-related muscle wasting, muscle atrophy due to neuromuscular disease and insulin resistance in diabetics. To date, she has 35 publications, most in top-tier journals, and a number of them very highly cited (one more than 600 times already).

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English, Samuel

Adjunct Faculty, Kinesiology

email


0224

Research Summary : Sam is a recent MA program graduate who is a part of the Exercise Physiology (KNES 360) laboratory instruction team.

 

Hagberg, James

Professor, Kinesiology

email website

(301) 405-2487
2134E SPH Bldg.

Research Focus : Aging, Cardiovascular Exercise Physiology, Exercise Intervention, Exercise and Genomics

Research Summary : Jim Hagberg, PhD, is a Professor in the Department of Kinesiology at the University of Maryland, College Park. Dr Hagberg is also the Co-Chair of the University of Maryland Institutional Review Board (IRB). He is also a Professor of Geriatrics/Gerontology in the Division of Geriatrics, Department of Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine and Baltimore Veterans Administration Medical Center. His major academic emphasis is research and teaching and he is and has been funded by NIH, the VA, the American Heart Association, and the US Olympic Committee. His graduate students, both Masters and Doctoral, are intimately involved in his research grant projects. His current research addresses the effect of acute and chronic exercise on circulating angiogenic cells, a type of adult stem cell that has recently been recognized as a novel cardiovascular disease risk factor. His work involves functional, gene expression, and molecular studies under cell culture and ex vivo conditions using a number of pharmacologic inhibitors and activators in these cells isolated from a wide range of active and inactive individuals. Dr. Hagberg is also deeply committed to undergraduate teaching as evidenced by his KNES 260 course entitled "Science of Physical Activity and Cardiovascular Health" that he teaches as part of the campus-wide liberal arts CORE program. Dr Hagberg was one of six campus-wide UMCP Distinguished Scholar-Teachers for 2002-2003. In 2002 Dr Hagberg also received the University System of Maryland Regent's Award for Research. He also was awarded the American College of Sports Medicine Citation Award in 2004.

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Hurley, Ben

Professor, Kinesiology

email website

(301) 405-2486
2134D SPH Bldg.

Research Focus : Aging, Exercise Intervention, Integrative Exercise Biology, Physical Activity Intervention

Research Summary : My research interests consist of the effects of aging, diet and exercise training on risk factors for age-related diseases and disability.

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Phillips, Jennie

Lecturer/Advisor, Kinesiology

email

(301) 405-3056
2318 SPH Bldg.

 

Rogers, Marc A.

Associate Professor, Kinesiology

email website

(301) 405-2484
2140 SPH Bldg.

Research Focus : Exercise Intervention

Research Summary : Trained as an exercise physiologist, Dr. Rogers' research interests are the effects of aging on skeletal muscle structure, function and metabolism. Dr. Rogers is currently the Human Subjects' Liaison for the Department of Kinesiology with the Institutional Review Board at the University. He can be contacted with questions about the process of human subjects review of research projects in the department.

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Roth, Stephen M.

Associate Professor, Associate Chair & Graduate Director, Kinesiology

email website

(301) 405-2504
2351F SPH Bldg.

Research Focus : Aging, Exercise and Genomics, Molecular Aspects of Exercise

Research Summary : Dr. Roth's areas of interest include understanding the role of genetic variation (and environmental interaction) in determining inter-individual differences in exercise responses, skeletal muscle traits, and other health-related phenotypes; as well as understanding the role of exercise/physical activity in modifying DNA structure (e.g., telomere length, DNA methylation). He directs the Functional Genomics Laboratory.

Lab Affiliations :

Functional Genomics Laboratory

Affiliations :

Affiliate Faculty, NACS Program

 

Spangenburg, Espen

Associate Professor, Kinesiology

email website

(301) 405-2483
2134A SPH Bldg.

Research Focus : Integrative Exercise Biology, Molecular Aspects of Exercise

Research Summary : The primary goal of Dr. Spangenburg's NIH-funded laboratory is to understand the influence of sex steroids on molecular and cellular mechanisms that regulate skeletal muscle, hepatic, and adipose tissue function. In particular, the laboratory emphasis is focused on defining cellular signaling mechanisms that are altered by sex steroids that influence metabolic function.

Lab Affiliations :

Molecular Systems Lab

Affiliations :

Interdisciplinary Training Program in Muscle Biology. School of Medicine; Graduate Program in Molecular and Cellular Biology; UMB Nutrition and Obesity Research Center; Baltimore Diabetes Research Training Center Molecular and Cell Biology Graduate Group, College Park, MD

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