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Linda Aldoory Linda Aldoory, Herschel S. Horowitz Endowed Chair and Director of the Center for Health Literacy

Office of the Dean | Behavioral and Community Health

2367E SPH Bldg.   laldoory@umd.edu

(301) 405-0388



Dr. Aldoory conducts and publishes studies in health communication, focusing on diverse audiences of health campaigns and media messages. Her multi-methodological research emphasizes women's health and adolescent health. She is former Director of the Center for Risk Communication Research and has won several research paper awards. Some of the scholarly journals she is published in are Journal of Communication, Health Communication, Journal of Health Communication: International Perspectives, Journalism and Mass Communication Quarterly, Communication Yearbook, and Journal of Public Relations Research. Her most recent book chapters are in the Handbook of Health Communication and the Handbook of Risk and Crisis Communication. Aldoory has been recipient of research grants from the Joint Institute for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition and from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, and continues to consult for various health and social service agencies.

Elaine Anderson Elaine Anderson, Chair of Family Science - Professor

Family Science

1142Y SPH Bldg.   eanders@umd.edu

(301) 405-4010



A former Congressional Science Fellow, Dr. Anderson focuses her research on family policy issues, at risk families, rural families, and health policy. Having been awarded over $2.7 million in external funding, she has conducted policy analysis/research for the United States Senate, the Connecticut Legislature, the Minnesota Legislature, and for two Presidential Campaigns. She is a Fellow in the National Council on Family Relations. Dr. Anderson serves on numerous journal editorial boards, currently including the Journal of Family Relations and the Journal of Family and Economic Issues. She has edited three family policy books, and written and collaborated on numerous policy publications. She has received the College outstanding teacher and outstanding research awards.

Click here to visit faculty web page

Anne Anderson-Sawyer Anne Anderson-Sawyer, Lecturer

Behavioral and Community Health

2387 SPH Bldg.   aasawyer@umd.edu

(301) 405-2518



Anne Anderson-Sawyer is a lecturer in the Department of Behavioral and Community Health. She is also the Coordinator of the BCH Undergraduate and MPH Internship Program.

David Andrews David L Andrews, Professor

Kinesiology

2359 SPH Bldg.   dla@umd.edu

(301) 405-2474



Sports and late capitalism; Cultural Studies; Contemporary cultural theory; Globalization and sport; For more information please see Physical Cultural Studies Website or Dr Andrews' research webpage.

Amelia Arria Amelia Arria, Director, Center on Young Adult Health and Development, Associate professor

Behavioral and Community Health

8400 Baltimore Ave, Suite 100   aarria@umd.edu

(301) 405-9795



Amelia M. Arria, Ph.D. is the Principal Investigator of the College Life Study. She is an epidemiologist with special research interests in understanding risk and resiliency associated with underage drinking and illicit drug use, investigating the prenatal effects of maternal drug exposure, and translating research findings for parents and families.

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Kenneth Beck Kenneth Beck, Professor

Behavioral and Community Health

2387 SPH Bldg   kbeck1@umd.edu

(301) 405-2527



Kenneth Beck received a Ph.D. in Social Psychology from Syracuse University. He is a Professor in the Department of Behavioral and Community Health at the University of Maryland. His research interests include the determinants of threat perception, and risk taking, including alcohol misuse and impaired driving. His research has dealt with adolescents and parents, as well as multiple DWI offenders.

No Picture Adam Beissel, Instructor

Kinesiology

SPH 2363   abeissel@umd.edu



Adam is a member of the PCS Research Group in the department of Kinesiology. His research advances the critical and theoretical study of physical culture by interrogating the cultural and political economies of sport and the active body. He is currently working toward completing his Ph.D. thesis at the University of Otago in New Zealand entitled "Sons of Samoa - Football, Postcolonial Subjectivity, and the Cultural Politics of Neoliberal Athletic Labor Markets." His project is an ethnographic exploration of interconnections between football, Samoan identity, and historical and contextual power relations.

Andrew Billingsley Andrew Billingsley, Professor Emeritus

Family Science

  abilling@gwm.sc.edu

(803) 777-8760



Dr. Billingsley is the author of seven books, including: The Black Church and Social Reform (1999); Climbing Jacob's Ladder (1992); Black Families in White America (1968, 1988); The Evolution of the Black Family (1974); Children of the Storm: Black Children in American Child Welfare (1971). He is also the recipient of numerous professional awards including: Community Leadership Award (1988) from the National Council of Negro Women; Marie Peters Award from the National Council on Family Relations (1989); and the DuBois, Johnson, Frazier Award from the American Sociological Association (1992).

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Bradley Boekeloo Bradley Boekeloo, Professor and Director, UMD PRC

Behavioral and Community Health

2387 SPH Bldg.   boekeloo@umd.edu

(301) 405-8546



Dr. Boekeloo is a professor in the Department of Behavioral and Community Health and director of the University of Maryland Prevention Research Center (UMD PRC), whose mission is to reduce health disparities in Maryland along the national capital border. The UMC PRC facilitates research to develop models of disease prevention and health promotion through community-based participatory research (CBPR). Dr. Boekeloo's research focuses on STD/HIV prevention, adolescent health and patient/provider communications.

Bonnie Braun Bonnie Braun, Professor; Health Literacy Faculty Scholar

Family Science | Office of the Dean

1142Z SPH Bldg.   bbraun@umd.edu

(301) 405-3581



Dr. Braun is a Professor in the Department of Family Science and holds an appointment as Family Policy Specialist with the University of Maryland Extension. She also serves as a Faculty Scholar in the Horowitz Center for Health Literacy. Her research focuses on family health literacy education and policy, rural, low-income family health and program evaluation. She's author of over 100 articles and has directed funded research and outreach projects totally over $15M.

More on Dr. Braun


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Amy Brown Amy Brown, Professor of Entomology; Affiliate in MIAEH

Maryland Institute for Applied Environmental Health

  amybrown@umd.edu

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Dr. Brown coordinates the State of Maryland Pesticide Education & Assessment Program. Her research focuses on identifying practices that minimize exposure and can be effectively implemented, and on health effects of pesticide exposure.

Dr. Brown's web page.

Elizabeth Brown Elizabeth Brown, Instructor

Kinesiology

2353 SPH Bldg.   ebrown2@umd.edu

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(301) 405-2503



Dr. Elizabeth Brown has been on the faculty in the Department of Kinesiology at the University of Maryland, College Park for the past twenty years.

She has a focus is on undergraduate teaching, advising and recruiting.

Antonio Busalacchi Antonio J Busalacchi, Professor Atmostpheric and Oceanic Science; Affiliate in MIAEH

Maryland Institute for Applied Environmental Health

  tonyb@essic.umd.edu

(301) 405-5599



Antonio Busalacchi is the Director of ESSIC and a Professor in the Department of Atmospheric & Oceanic Science. Tony came to ESSIC in 2000, after serving as Chief of the NASA/Goddard Laboratory for Hydrospheric Processes. Tony received his Ph.D. degree in oceanography from Florida State University in 1982. He has studied tropical ocean circulation and its role in the coupled climate system. His interests include the study of climate variability and prediction, tropical ocean modeling, ocean remote sensing, and data assimilation. His research in these areas has supported a range of international and national research programs dealing with global change and climate, particularly as affected by the oceans.

Dr. Busalacchi's Webpage

James Butler James Butler, Assistant Professor

Behavioral and Community Health

2320 SPH Bldg.   jbutler9@umd.edu

(301) 405-0757



Dr. Butler has a Dr.P.H. in Health Services Administration from the University of Pittsburgh, Graduate School of Public Health. He completed a postdoctoral fellowship in cancer prevention and tobacco control at the University of Kansas, School of Medicine. His research interests are tobacco control and prevention and the social and environmental influences on smoking. Thus, his research is anchored in an ecological framework that incorporates individual, social structure and environmental influences in understanding and eliminating tobacco-related health disparities. To eliminate these disparities, he believes it is imperative to build ongoing and permanent relationships with community members and to design and conduct interventions where the community participates fully in all aspects of the research process.

Mia Bynum Mia Smith Bynum, Associate Professor

Family Science

1142W SPH Bldg.   msbynum@umd.edu

(301) 405-0299



Dr. Mia Smith Bynum is an associate professor in the Department of Family Science. Her research focus includes African American family processes, parenting in ecological context, African American mental health, adolescent mental health, racial identity, racism and health, risk and resilience in African American youth.

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Olivia Carter-Pokras Olivia Carter-Pokras, Associate Professor

Epidemiology and Biostatistics

2234G SPH Bldg.   opokras@umd.edu

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(301) 405-8037



Olivia Carter-Pokras, Ph.D. is an Associate Professor in Epidemiology at the University of Maryland College Park School of Public Health (UMCP-SPH). A health disparities researcher for 3 decades in the Federal government and academia, Dr. Carter-Pokras has been recognized by the Governor of Maryland, Surgeon General, Assistant Secretary for Health, and Latino Caucus of the American Public Health Association for her career achievements to improve health care quality for Latinos, improve racial and ethnic data, and develop health policy to address health disparities. While at UMCP-SPH, she has focused her research, service and education efforts to support translation of epidemiologic research into policy and practice to improve Latino population health. Dr. Carter-Pokras is an elected fellow of the American College of Epidemiology and a member of the American Public Health Associations Education Board. She currently chairs the American College of Epidemiologys Policy Committee, and has served on the Institute of Medicines Advancing Pain Research, Care, and Education Committee. A long-time member of Montgomery Countys Latino Health Steering Committee, Dr. Carter-Pokras conducts health assessments of Latinos in Baltimore and Montgomery County in close partnership with local government and community based organizations, and has led NIH funded research projects to develop cultural competency and health literacy curricula, and address oral health of Latino and Ethiopian children and their mothers. She is the Evaluation Director for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-funded Prevention Research Center at the University of Maryland. Dr. Carter-Pokras has published more than 56 peer-reviewed journal articles, and her research has played a critical role in national recognition of health disparities experienced by Latinos. Dr. Carter-Pokras lectures on chronic disease epidemiology, epidemiologic methods, cultural competency and health disparities to public health students and health professionals.

Websites:

http://www.popcenter.umd.edu/mprc-associates/opokras

http://sph.umd.edu/epib/cultural_competency/

http://medschool.umaryland.edu/FACULTYRESEARCHPROFILE/viewprofile.aspx?id=7870

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Olivia_Carter-pokras/

http://www.researcherid.com/rid/B-1652-2012

http://www.experts.scival.com/maryland/expert.asp?n=Carter-Pokras%2C+Olivia&u_id=1867

http://pivot.cos.com/profiles/E1281336AC1BD0115A939B2D8FDCAE34

David Chae David Chae, Assistant Professor

Epidemiology and Biostatistics

2234B SPH Building    hdchae@umd.edu

(301) 405-6425



Dr. David Chae is an assistant professor in the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics. His previous appointment was as an assistant professor in the Department of Behavioral Sciences and Health Education at the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University. Dr. Chaes research focuses on how racism, discrimination/prejudice and dimensions of racial/ethnic identity impact health through psychological and biological processes. He received his Doctor of Science degree from the Harvard School of Public Health.

Jie Chen Jie Chen, Assistant Professor

Health Services Administration

3310A SPH Building   jichen@umd.edu

(301) 405-9053



Dr. Jie Chen is an assistant professor in the Department of Health Services Administration, School of Public Health, at the University of Maryland, College Park. She received her PhD (2008) degree in economics from Stony Brook University. Dr. Chen conducts research in two fields (1) health disparity and (2) health policy analysis. Her health disparity research focuses on identifying and quantifying the factors associated with the disparities in health care access, utilization and expenditure among different racial and ethnic groups and immigrants in the United States. Dr. Chens research on health policy focuses on investigating the efficiency and quality of the health care delivery system. She is specialized in mental health policy analysis among the culturally and linguistically diversified population. She also has conducted studies on patient-centered care, consumer activation, health information technology and health insurance cost-sharing strategies. An additional field of her research involves applying economic and econometric models to broad health services research. Dr. Chens recent work has been published in Medical Care, Health Affairs, Health Services Research, American Journal of Public Health, Empirical Economics, and other peer-reviewed health services and economic journals.

http://www.jiechen.org

Shuo Chen Shuo Chen, Assistant Professor

Epidemiology and Biostatistics

2234M SPH Building   shuochen@umd.edu

(301) 405-6421



Dr. Chen is an Assistant Professor of Biostatistics at School of Public Health, University of Maryland College Park. He received his Ph.D. degree in Biostatistics from Emory University in 2012, under the advising of Dr. DuBois Bowman.

His primary research interest focuses on developing statistical methods for the complex high-dimensional biomedical data including neuroimaging data and proteomics data by using tools of machine learning, Bayesian methods, and functional data analysis.

Eva Chin Eva R Chin, Assistant Professor

Kinesiology

2134B SPH Bldg   erchin@umd.edu

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(301) 405-2478



Dr. Eva Chin is an Assistant Professor in Kinesiology. She received her PhD in Kinesiology at the University of Waterloo in Canada and then completed postdoctoral fellowships in Physiology at the University of Sydney in Australia and in Molecular Cardiology at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center.

Prior to coming to the University of Maryland Dr. Chin worked for Pfizer Global Research & Development as a Principle Scientist in the Frailty and Diabetes therapeutic areas. She then became an Associate Director working with teams on early stage clinical trials for novel Obesity and Osteoporosis drugs.

Dr. Chin's research emphasis is on calcium signaling in skeletal muscle and the role that calcium plays in both maintaining muscle force output and regulating muscle gene expression. By understanding how calcium signals in skeletal muscle, this research may help in optimizing exercise and drug prescriptions for treating age-related muscle wasting, muscle atrophy due to neuromuscular disease and insulin resistance in diabetics. To date, she has 35 publications, most in top-tier journals, and a number of them very highly cited (one more than 600 times already).


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Jane Clark Jane Clark, Professor and Dean

Kinesiology | Office of the Dean

2242 SPH Bldg.   jeclark@umd.edu

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(301) 405-2438



Jane E. Clark was appointed dean of the University of Maryland School of Public Health on July 1, 2012. She is a Professor in the Department of Kinesiology and previously served as chair of that department for ten years. Her work focuses on understanding the development of movement control and coordination in motor skills. Using a dynamic systems approach, Dr. Clark and her colleagues have demonstrated that the newly walking infants limbs, like those of the adult walker, act like coupled nonlinear limit cycle oscillators at both the intralimb and interlimb levels of coordination. Her current research examines the role of sensory information in the development of upright posture and locomotion in infants.

Rita Colwell Rita Colwell, Distinguished University Professor - Affiliate in MIAEH

Maryland Institute for Applied Environmental Health

Biomolecular Sciences Building   rcolwell@umd.edu

301.405.9550



U.S. Science Envoy to Southeast Asia, Dr. Colwell is a Distinguished Professor at both the University of Maryland at College Park and Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health. She has focused her research on global infectious diseases, water and health, and is currently developing an international network to address emerging infectious diseases and safe drinking water for both the developed and developing world. Dr. Colwell served as the 11th Director of the National Science Foundation from 1998-2004. She is recipient of the 2010 Stockholm Water Prize awarded on September 9, 2010 by the King of Sweden.

No Picture Emily Cook, Faculty Research Assistant for the Maryland Veterans Behavioral Health Initiative with the State of Maryland

Family Science

  etcook@umd.edu



Emily Cook is a third year Family Science doctoral candidate from Montgomery Village, Maryland. She earned a B.A. with Highest Honors in Psychology from Emory University and a M.S. in Couple and Family Therapy from the University of Maryland. Emily's masters thesis investigated the impacts of trauma symptoms on maternal parenting and child psychological health. Her dissertation will examine the impacts of deployment on active duty military couples' marital satisfaction using longitudinal data from the Department of Defense. Emily currently serves as Project Director for the Maryland Veterans Resilience Initiative, a two year grant that partners the University of Maryland School of Public Health with the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. She also works in a private practice as a licensed couple and family therapist. In her time away from clients and work, Emily enjoys spending time in the company of her husband and friends, exploring new local restaurants, and reading novels.

Raul Cruz-Cano Raul Cruz-Cano, Research Assistant Professor

Epidemiology and Biostatistics

2234FF SPH Building   raulcruz@umd.edu

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(301) 405-0560



Dr. Cruz-Cano has a M.S. in Statistics and a Ph.D. in Computer Engineering from the University of Texas at El Paso. His research interests include Computational Statistics, Computational Intelligence and Bioinformatics.

Rada Dagher Rada Dagher, Assistant Professor

Health Services Administration

3310B SPH Building   rdagher1@umd.edu

(301) 405-1210



Dr.Dagher received her Ph.D. in 2007 and her dissertation was nominated for the University of Minnesota Best Dissertation Award. Her research focuses on the risk and protective factors associated with maternal postpartum depression and the impact of this mental disorder on health services use and costs. She also studies the impact of work policies (e.g., policies of maternity leave after childbirth and job flexibility policies), work organization (e.g., job demands, job control, and supervisor and coworker support), and work-family conflict on workers mental and physical health outcomes and health care expenditures. To answer these research questions, she uses quantitative statistical methods that pertain to cross-sectional and longitudinal data.


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Cher Dallal Cher Dallal, Assistant Professor

Epidemiology and Biostatistics

2234GG SPH Building   cdallal@umd.edu

(301) 405-7065



Dr. Cher Dallal is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics and comes to the School of Public Health from the National Cancer Institute where she was a Cancer Prevention Fellow. Dr. Dallals research focuses on the evaluation of lifestyle and hormonal factors as they relate to estrogen-mediated carcinogenesis of the breast, endometrium and ovary. Her research centers on the following key areas: endogenous sex steroids with an emphasis on estrogen metabolism; active and sedentary behavior, obesity, and obesity-derived hormones; and, interrelationships between hormones, obesity, physical activity, and cancer risk. In addition to exploring health behaviors, their interaction with biology and potential role in cancer prevention, Dr. Dallal is interested in understanding racial/ethnic disparities in cancer incidence and survival.

No Picture Dena Deglau, Research Assistant Professor

Kinesiology

2312 SPH Bldg   ddeglau@umd.edu

301-405-2475



 

Sharon Desmond Sharon Desmond, Associate Professor

Behavioral and Community Health

2376 SPH Bldg.   desmond@umd.edu

(301) 405-2526



Dr. Desmond's research interests are in minority and community health issues, including violence prevention programs for high-risk youth and community-university partnerships (she is a founding member of the Seat Pleasant-University of Maryland Health Partnership). She has experience with program evaluation and survey development; she worked on the Cash and Counseling Demonstration and Evaluation Preference Study (an evaluation of consumer directed personal care services for the elderly and people with disabilities), funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

No Picture Nicole Deziel, Research Fellow, NIH, Bethesda, MD, National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Occupational and Environmental Epidemiology Branch; Adjunct in MIAEH

Maryland Institute for Applied Environmental Health

  dezielnc@mail.nih.gov

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(301) 402-7825



 

No Picture Samuel English, Adjunct Faculty

Kinesiology

0224   senglish@umd.edu



Sam is a recent MA program graduate who is a part of the Exercise Physiology (KNES 360) laboratory instruction team.


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Norman Epstein Norman Epstein, Professor

Family Science

1142X SPH Bldg.   nbe@umd.edu

(301) 405-4013



Dr. Epstein focuses on assessment and treatment of couple relationships, cognitive-behavioral therapy, depression, anxiety, cross-cultural research on family relationships, domestic violence, and family coping with stress. He is the author/editor of four books: Depression in the Family (1986), Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy with Families (1988), Cognitive-Behavioral Marital Therapy (1990), and Enhanced Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Couples: A Contextual Approach (2002).

Click here to visit faculty web page

Patty Fanflick Patty Fanflick, Instructor

Family Science

1232 SPH Bldg.   pfanflik@msn.com



Patty Fanflik is a fifth year Family Science doctoral candidate and a native of Maryland. She received her Bachelor's degree in Psychology from Palm Beach Atlantic University, a Master's of Science in Human Development and Family Science from Kansas State University, and a Master's of Arts in Sociology from Southern Illinois University. Patty spent six years as deputy director of the Office of Research and Evaluation at the National District Attorneys Association/American Prosecutors Research Institute. She is also a licensed Marriage and Family Therapist. Patty's research experience has included large-scale national surveys, experimental and quasi-experimental investigations, and qualitative case studies.

Colleen Farmer Colleen Farmer, Assistant Dean, Undergraduate Affairs

Office of the Dean

2242B SPH Bldg.   cfarmer@umd.edu

(301) 405-2473



Colleeen (aka "Coke") Farmer is the assistant dean for undergraduate affairs in the School of Public Health. She is a native cheesehead and graduated from the University of Wisconsin with a degree in physical education. She served in the Peace Corps after college while figuring out what to do with her life. She earned her master's degree in exercise science from the iceberg called Northern Michigan University, coached college field hockey and then sought warmth and culture while earning her Ph.D. in exercise physiology at the University of Maryland. Her dissertation was entitled, "Effects of Strength Training on Lipoporotein Lipid Profiles and Post-Heparin Lipase Activity" and, after eight years in administration, no longer understands a word of it. She was most fortunate to be the Director of the Wellness Research Laboratory, the university's faculty and staff wellness program, for 15 years, and served five years as the assistant chair in the Department of Kinesiology before becoming assistant dean. She still believes our mission can change the world.

Robert Feldman Robert Feldman, Professor of Behavioral and Community Health; Affiliate in MIAEH

Maryland Institute for Applied Environmental Health | Behavioral and Community Health

2387 SPH Bldg.   rfeldman@umd.edu

(301) 405-2519



Dr. Robert Feldman is an occupational health psychologist with a primary appointment in the Department of Behavioral and Community Health where he teaches a course entitled Health Education in the Workplace. He is co-author of Occupational Health Promotion: Health Behavior in the Workplace. Before coming to the University of Maryland, Dr. Feldman was on the faculty of Johns Hopkins University School of Public Health in the Divisions of Health Education and Occupational Medicine working on the NIOSH Educational Resource Center. His current research includes workplace smoking cessation among Costa Rican government workers and US Latino workers. For the past 15 years Dr Feldman has been evaluating NIEHS Hazardous Materials Worker Health and Safety Programs.

Nicole Finkbeiner Nicole Finkbeiner, Instructor

Family Science

1230 SPH Bldg.   nicole4@umd.edu

(301) 405-3672



Nicole Finkbeiner is a fifth year Family Science doctoral candidate from Levittown, PA. She completed her undergraduate studies at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, with a B.S in Psychology and a minor in Womens Studies. She earned a M.S. in Marriage and Family Therapy from University of Maryland College Park. Nicole has worked at Saint Marys County Detention Center, serving as a liaison between incarcerated individuals and various criminal justice organizations. She has also interned at the Human Rights Campaign in D.C. Nicole is currently conducting research with FMSC faculty on the transition to adulthood.


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No Picture Michael Friedman, Research Assistant Professor

Kinesiology

  mtfried@umd.edu



Dr. Friedman's research focuses the relationship between sport and governance in the postindustrial city with a perspective informed by cultural studies and cultural geography. By examining sports facilities such as stadiums and arenas, he is concerned with the ways in which space expresses and (re)produces power relationships, social identities, and societal structures. His research has been recognized by the North American Society for the Sociology of Sport and has been published in the Sociology of Sport Journal, Journal of Urban Affairs, Journal of Sport History, and Economic Development Quarterly. For more information, please visit the Physical Cultural Studies website.

Craig Fryer Craig S Fryer, Assistant Professor

Behavioral and Community Health

2324 SPH Bldg.   csfryer@umd.edu

(301) 405-0818



Dr. Craig S. Fryer, DrPH, MPH is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Behavioral and Community Health and holds a leadership position in the newly established Center for Health Equity at the University of Maryland. He completed undergraduate studies at Case Western Reserve University in Clinical Nutrition with a minor in Human Development. Dr. Fryer received his MPH from the University of Pittsburgh in Health Services Administration with an emphasis in community health promotion and received his DrPH with a focus in Sociomedical Sciences from the Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University.

Trained as behavioral scientist, Dr. Fryer utilizes mixed methods research to examine the sociocultural context of health and health disparities, with a concentration in community-engaged research. His work focuses on racial and ethnic health disparities in substance use and dependence, specifically tobacco and marijuana among urban youth and young adult populations. Collateral research endeavors include: qualitative methods; behavioral intervention research; HIV/AIDS and STI prevention; and the recruitment and retention of underrepresented communities into research.

Laura Garnier Dykstra Laura Garnier Dykstra, Faculty Research Associate, Center on Young Adult Health and Development

Family Science

8400 Baltimore Ave, Suite 100   ldykstra@umd.edu

(301) 405-9749



Laura M. Garnier Dykstra, M.A. is a Faculty Research Associate. Her research interests include diversion and nonmedical use of prescription medications, the impacts of parents and peers on drug use and minor deviance and associations between drug use and mental health.

Mary Garza Mary A. Garza, Assistant Professor

Behavioral and Community Health

2322 SPH Bldg   magarza@umd.edu

(301) 405-0766



Mary A.Garza, PhD, MPH is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Behavioral and Community Health and she will have a leadership role in the newly established Center for Health Equity at the University of Maryland. Dr. Garza received her MPH from the School of Public Health at San Diego State University with an emphasis in health education and health promotion. She received her PhD in Health Policy and Management with a focus in Social and Behavioral Sciences from the Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University where she also completed a post-doctoral fellowship in Cancer Epidemiology.

Dr. Garza's research activities embrace the full spectrum of the intervention research process from planning, developing, implementing, and evaluating, to dissemination of research findings using a community-based participatory research approach. She has a strong interest in health disparities research, including understanding the interplay of psychosocial, behavioral, and neighborhood-level factors associated with health behavior; specifically, the factors related to sustained compliance with cancer screening. Dr. Garza's research interests also include the role and influence of religion and spirituality on health outcomes.

Ned Gaylin Ned Gaylin, Professor Emeritus

Family Science

  ngaylin@umd.edu

(301) 405-4006



Dr. Gaylin's research focuses on family therapy theory, process, and outcome; parent-child relationships; and impact of community violence on families. He has published in such journals as Journal of Consulting Psychology, Family Relations, Human Sexuality, Journal of Clinical Child Psychology, and The Person-Centered Review.

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No Picture Rodolphe Gentili, Research Assistant Professor

Kinesiology

2144 E SPH Bldg.   rodolphe@umd.edu

(301) 405-2490



Dr. Gentili's research focuses on the investigation of functional non-invasive brain biomarkers, which assess the level of cognitive-motor performance and learning when humans interact with new dynamics or kinematics tools. Another aspect of his research is to develop bio-inspired control systems able to learn to manipulate anthropomorphic robot limbs (arm/finger), while at the same time incorporating the main biomechanical features of human movement. These two research fields contribute to the development of next generation smart prosthetics.

No Picture Andrew Ginsberg, Instructor

Kinesiology

  aginsber@umd.edu



Drew Ginsberg has his Bachelors in Applied Exercise Science from Springfield College and his Master's in Physical Education from Manhattanville College. For four years he was an assistant men's lacrosse coach at Manhattanville College in Purchase New York. He has also taught middle and high school health and physical education, and has coached high school soccer in New York State.

Elbert D. Glover Elbert D. Glover, Professor and Chair

Behavioral and Community Health

2387 SPH Bldg.   eglover1@umd.edu

(301) 405-2029



Dr. Glover serves as Professor and Chair, Department of Behavioral & Community Health. An internationally recognized authority on the topics of smoking cessation and smokeless tobacco, Dr. Glover has more than 200 publications and approximately 22 million dollars in grants from a variety of funding agencies.

Robert Gold Robert S. Gold, Founding SPH Dean, Professor and Chair

Epidemiology and Biostatistics

2234S SPH Bldg.   rsgold@umd.edu

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(301) 405-0271



Robert Gold is an accomplished researcher and nationally known expert in the application of technology in health education and health promotion. His publications include numerous research and evaluation articles, dozens of pieces of software for organizations such as the Addiction Research Foundation and the American Cancer Society, and commercially published software and textbooks. Dr. Gold was the founding dean of the School of Public Health, previously the chair of the Department of Behavioral and Community Health and has served as Vice President at ORC Macro.

Frances  Goldscheider Frances K. Goldscheider , College Park Professor

Family Science

1142K SPH Bldg.   frances_goldscheider@brown.edu

(301) 405-3672



Research Focus:

Families and households, living arrangements of fathers, gender roles, methodology, ethnicity

Click here to visit faculty web page


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Kerry Green Kerry Green

Behavioral and Community Health

2375 SPH Bldg.   greenkm@umd.edu

(301) 405-2524



Dr. Green is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Behavioral and Community Health. Dr. Green brings to the department expertise in prevention science, with a particular focus on school-based interventions for children. Her work focuses on development over the life course, and in particular how early family, school, and environmental influences, as well as behaviors (e.g., substance use) affect later health and well-being. She is particularly interested in gender and racial differences in development. Much of her research has been with low-income, urban community populations followed longitudinally, and thus health disparities is a key topic of her research. She is skilled in advanced statistical techniques, in particular propensity score matching and latent variable modeling.

Stephanie Grutzmacher Stephanie Grutzmacher, Research Assistant Professor & Extension Family Specialist, University of Maryland Extension

Family Science

1142DD SPH, Bldg. 255   grutz@umd.edu

(301) 405-4012



Dr. Grutzmacher currently works in the areas of health and nutrition literacy, food security, and nutrition assistance and education for low-income populations. She is the PI on the Maryland Health and Nutrition Literacy Study, a needs assessment for Maryland FSNE aimed at improving our understanding of the nutrition knowledge, attitudes, skills, and behaviors of SNAP-eligible Maryland families. In a partnership with the Maryland State Department of Education, she is also serving as the Co-Project Director of a Team Nutrition Training Grant project aimed at examining the effectiveness of training food service staff to use nudges and other environmental cues to improve the nutrition environment and student fruit and vegetable selection in elementary school cafeterias.

Dr. Grutzmacher mentors the Food Deserts Gemstone team, which is conducting a multi-year undergraduate research project examining the food access environment in Prince George's County. She also advises the University of Maryland Alternative Breaks program's health teams, fostering experiential service learning experiences for undergraduate students in the areas of child health, health care access, and HIV/AIDS.

Click here to visit faculty web page

James Hagberg James Hagberg, Professor

Kinesiology

2134E SPH Bldg.   hagberg@umd.edu

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(301) 405-2487



Jim Hagberg, PhD, is a Professor in the Department of Kinesiology at the University of Maryland, College Park. Dr Hagberg is also the Co-Chair of the University of Maryland Institutional Review Board (IRB). He is also a Professor of Geriatrics/Gerontology in the Division of Geriatrics, Department of Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine and Baltimore Veterans Administration Medical Center. His major academic emphasis is research and teaching and he is and has been funded by NIH, the VA, the American Heart Association, and the US Olympic Committee. His graduate students, both Masters and Doctoral, are intimately involved in his research grant projects. His current research addresses the effect of acute and chronic exercise on circulating angiogenic cells, a type of adult stem cell that has recently been recognized as a novel cardiovascular disease risk factor. His work involves functional, gene expression, and molecular studies under cell culture and ex vivo conditions using a number of pharmacologic inhibitors and activators in these cells isolated from a wide range of active and inactive individuals. Dr. Hagberg is also deeply committed to undergraduate teaching as evidenced by his KNES 260 course entitled "Science of Physical Activity and Cardiovascular Health" that he teaches as part of the campus-wide liberal arts CORE program. Dr Hagberg was one of six campus-wide UMCP Distinguished Scholar-Teachers for 2002-2003. In 2002 Dr Hagberg also received the University System of Maryland Regent's Award for Research. He also was awarded the American College of Sports Medicine Citation Award in 2004.

Bradley Hatfield Bradley Hatfield, Professor & Chair

Kinesiology

2351 SPH Bldg.   bhatfiel@umd.edu

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(301) 405-2485



Dr. Hatfield and his research team investigate exercise and sport psychology issues from a cognitive neuroscience or biological psychology perspective. Their research focuses on 1) health-related issues such as the effect of exercise on the aging brain and the protective effects of physical activity on brain processes that underlie memory and executive function. An important question is whether the neurobiological benefits of exercise are more prominent in those individuals who are genetically at risk for dementia and Alzheimer's disease. The research team also addresses 2) issues related to human performance in order to understand critical brain processes underlying superior cognitive-motor performance, how emotion alters the brain and the quality of performance, and the management of stress in high-performance individuals such as competitive athletes and specialized military personnel.

Xin He Xin He, Assistant Professor

Epidemiology and Biostatistics

2234H SPH Building   xinhe@umd.edu

(301) 405-2551



Xin He, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, University of Maryland, College Park.

Dr. He's current research focuses on longitudinal data analysis, survival analysis, nonparametric and semiparametric methods, as well as applications in clinical trials, epidemiology, and other public health related studies.


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Sandra Hofferth Sandra Hofferth, Professor

Family Science

1142L SPH Bldg.   hofferth@umd.edu

(301) 405-8501



Dr. Hofferth's research interests include American children's use of time, immigrant child health, fathers and fathering, research methods, and family policy. She codirects the Maternal and Child Health Program in the Family Science Department. Hofferth has a NIH-funded study that integrates, documents and disseminates individual-level data on how people allocate their time. She also manages an NSF-funded research coordinating network that assists with developing and planning a set of observatories for the Social, Behavioral, and Economic (SBE) sciences.

Click here to visit faculty web page

Cheryl Holt Cheryl Holt, Associate Professor

Behavioral and Community Health

2369 SPH Bldg.   cholt14@umd.edu

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(301) 405-6659



Dr. Holt has a PhD in Social Psychology from Saint Louis University. She trained postdoctorally at the Health Communication Research Laboratory, School of Public Health, Saint Louis University. Her research interests involve community-based and culturally appropriate health communication, and the application of spirituality/religiosity to these interventions. She is also involved in the scientific study of the role of religious involvement in health cognitions, behaviors, and outcomes. Dr. Holt is involved in instrument development and validation in these areas as well.

Donna Howard Donna Howard, Associate Professor

Behavioral and Community Health

2387 SPH Bldg.   dhoward1@umd.edu

(301) 405-2520



Thematically my research has concentrated on adolescent engagement in risk and protective health behaviors, with a directed focus on these behaviors among urban African American youth. In an effort to understand the psychosocial influences on behavior I have explored the relationship between stress and coping processes, and adolescent risk taking and resilience. One behavioral outcome of particular interest has been violence and in this regard my research has examined its correlates, predictors, consequences, and protective factors.

Katie  Hrapczynski Katie Hrapczynski, Instructor

Family Science

1232 SPH Bldg.   katieh@umd.edu



Katie is a fifth year Family Science doctoral student, is originally from Malvern, PA. She graduated from Duke University with a B.S. in Psychology, a Certificate in Human Development, and a minor in Sociology. She earned a M.S. in Couple and Family Therapy at the University of Maryland. Katie has won a Post-baccalaureate Intramural Research Training Award at the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, N.I.C.H.D. She also worked as a Residential Leader at the Good Shepherd Center in Baltimore, a research assistant at the University of Delaware, a Clinical Intern at the Center for Adoption Support and Education, and as a research specialist at the Atlantic Coast Child Welfare Implementation Center. Katie currently teaches FMSC 302, Research Methods for Family Science in Public Health. Her Masters Thesis focused on the impact of couple therapy for abusive behavior on partner's negative attributions about each other and the relationship between cognitive and behavioral change. Her dissertation explores the role of the adoptive family environment and discrepancies in parent-adolescent views of their family on the development of transracially adopted adolescents.

No Picture Shizuka Hsieh, Assistant Provost for the Sciences, Associate Professor of the Chemistry Department, Trinity Washington University; Adjunct in MIAEH

Maryland Institute for Applied Environmental Health

  shsieh@smith.edu

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(202) 884-9299



Dr. Hsieh is Assistant Provost for the Sciences and Associate Professor of Chemistry at Trinity Washington University. Formerly Associate Professor of Chemistry at Smith College, she has environmental research experience in elucidating photochemical sources of atmospheric OH radicals and in quantifying volatile organics in air and water. She holds a DPhil from Oxford University, under a Marshall Scholarship, and a BA from Carleton College. She is recipient of a Henry Dreyfus Teacher Scholar Award and a former AAAS Science and Technology Policy Fellow at US EPA. Her current atmospheric research builds upon her work at EPA focused on environmental justice.


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Anwar Huq Anwar Huq, Research Professor, Maryland Pathogen Research Institute; Affiliate in MIAEH

Maryland Institute for Applied Environmental Health

3132 Bioscience Research Building   huqanwar@gmail.com

(301) 405-7428



Dr. Anwar Huq is a Professor in the Maryland Pathogen Institute at the University of Maryland. He came to Maryland as a faculty in the Department of Microbiology in 1989. He received his PhD in microbiology from the University of Maryland in 1984 He has studied the ecology of Vibrio cholerae and plankton, more specifically copepods, its host in the environment that lead to major findings in the survival, multiplication and transmission of this pathogen in the environment.

Dr. Huq's research interest includes understanding of pathogens, focusing on waterborne pathogens with the ultimate goal of disease prevention and or intervention. Bacterial pathogens that are occurring naturally in the environment cannot be eradicated. Moreover, with global climate change, significant impact is expected to take place on many of these pathogens. His work on the ecology, survival, transmission and detection of V. cholerae with ultimate goal for prediction and prevention of the disease cholera involving conventional microbiological methods, immunological methods, and molecular biology, along with oceanography, limnological methods and satellite remote sensing technology. Dr. Huq has also worked extensively on safe drinking water for people in developing countries.

Ben Hurley Ben Hurley, Professor

Kinesiology

2134D SPH Bldg.   benhur@umd.edu

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(301) 405-2486



My research interests consist of the effects of aging, diet and exercise training on risk factors for age-related diseases and disability.

No Picture Lee Hurt, Deputy Director, Office of Surveillance and Quality Initiatives, Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Maternal and Childe Health Bureau, Baltimore, MD; Adjunct in MIAEH

Maryland Institute for Applied Environmental Health

  lhurt@umd.edu

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(410) 707-7123



 

Seppo Iso-Ahola Seppo Iso-Ahola, Professor

Kinesiology

2142 SPH Bldg.   isoahol@umd.edu

(301) 405-2505



Dr. Iso-Ahola's research interests and activities are two-fold: (1) Social psychological factors in athletic performance (e.g. mental training), and (2) social psychology of exercise and health (e.g. motivation for exercise). He has published four books and over 70 research articles in refereed journals and chapters in edited books. He has received 3 prestigious research awards and has been invited to serve as distinguished visiting professor in Australia, Canada, Finland, Holland, and New Zealand.

John Jeka John J. Jeka, Professor Emeritus

Kinesiology

2357 SPH Bldg.   jjeka@umd.edu

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(301) 405-2512



Dr. Jeka studies how the brain combines sensory information about the environment and one's own body movement to better understand patient populations with neurological disease and injury that lead to balance problems.


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Shannon Jette Shannon Jette, Assistant Professor

Kinesiology

SPH 2318   jette@umd.edu

(301) 405-2497



Dr. Jette is interested in socio-cultural aspects of health, physical activity and the (female) body, with a focus on: the production of biomedical knowledge about health and physical activity (i.e., how it is that certain ideas come to be accepted as "truth"); how this knowledge has been (and is) put to use in the operation of power in differing socio-historical contexts; representations of health and (un)healthy bodies in various cultural contexts; and the subject positions individuals take up in relation to various health-related messages. She is currently examining exercise and nutrition advice being provided to pregnant women in the context of the obesity epidemic and is utilizing feminist poststructuralist discourse analysis to explore how pregnant women of differing socio-cultural backgrounds understand and experience health, physical activity and pregnancy weight gain. Overall, Dr. Jette's research agenda is linked by a consistent focus on the multiple ways that active bodies are articulated into the operation of social power, with the aim of illuminating power inequalities and giving voice to subjugated knowledge(s).

Marian  Jones Marian Moser Jones, Assistant Professor

Family Science

SPH 1142K   moserj@umd.edu

(301) 405-8940



History and ethics of public health and human services, health policy and communications, sociomedical science

Click here to visit faculty web page

Samuel Kessel Samuel Kessel, Lecturer

Family Science

1142K SPH Bldg.   wkessel@umd.edu

(301) 405-3672



Dr. Kessel, a community pediatrician for over 30 years, is a distinguished advocate, educator, and researcher in public health, public policy, pediatrics, and maternal and child health. His career in the US Public Health Service included serving as an Assistant Surgeons General and a senior program director for applied research, community-based programs, and professional education.

Dr. Kessel developed and led countless MCH initiatives, including those focused on reducing infant mortality, expanding health insurance for children, improving environmental health, preventing childhood overweight and obesity, breaking the cycle of violence/trauma among children witnessing domestic violence and terrorism, and conducting a longitudinal study of child health and development.

Click here to visit faculty web page

Jinhee Kim Jinhee Kim, Assistant Professor & Family Finance Specialist, University of Maryland Extension

Family Science

1142P SPH Bldg.   jinkim@umd.edu

(301) 405-3500



Dr. Kim's areas of interest are family resource management, financial stress, and financial well-being.

Click here to visit faculty web page

Christopher King Christopher King, Lecturer

Health Services Administration

3310SPH Bldg.   cking@umd.edu

(301) 405-2469



Christopher King is board certified in healthcare management and a Fellow of the American College of Healthcare Executives. He received a Bachelor of Science in Community Health from East Carolina University and Master of Health Science from Towson University.

Christopher currently serves as Director of Corporate and Foundation Relations for Washington Hospital Center and is a member of the Board of Trustees for the Consumer Health Foundation. He collaborates with foundations and corporations to create health services that will increase access to care and improve the quality of care for residents of the Washington, D.C. area.

Christopher is committed to evidence-based medicine and building healthcare infrastructures that demonstrate improvements in safety, quality, and desired clinical outcomes.


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Dushanka Kleinman Dushanka Kleinman, Associate Dean for Research, Professor and Chair, Department of Health Services Administration

Health Services Administration | Office of the Dean

2242P SPH Bldg.   dushanka@umd.edu

(301) 405-7201



Dr. Kleinman is a dentist and a board certified specialist in dental public health. Her research has included epidemiologic studies of dental, oral and craniofacial diseases, oral cancer and HIV-related conditions. She has participated in the development of several Surgeon General reports and was the co-executive editor of Oral Health in America: A Report of the Surgeon General (2000). Dr. Kleinman has a particular interest in enhancing the understanding and elimination of health disparities, with a focus on the role of factors that transcend health conditions such as health determinants, health promotion interventions and health literacy.

Ken Klotz Ken Klotz, Adjunct Faculty

Kinesiology

2351 SPH Bldg.   kklotz@umd.edu

(301) 405-2450



 

Ivor Knight Ivor Knight, Chief Technology Officer, Senior Vice President of Canon U.S. Life Sciences, Inc.; Adjunct in MIAEH

Maryland Institute for Applied Environmental Health

  ivor.knight@canon.uslifesciences.com

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Dr. Knight is currently the Vice President and Director of Research and Development at Canon U.S. Life Sciences, Inc. His research interests include rapid molecular genetic techniques for pathogen detection, human genetics and diagnostic applications as well as the global movement of infectious disease agents and international cooperation to control infectious diseases.

More information on Dr. Knight

No Picture William Knight, Adjunct Professor

Family Science

  wknight@umd.edu



 

Sally Koblinksy Sally Koblinksy, Associate Dean for Diversity and Inclusion

Office of the Dean

  koblinsk@umd.edu



Dr. Koblinsky, a professor of family science, has been a vigorous advocate and leader within the School of Public Health and on the campus for equity, diversity, and inclusion. She has served on over 20 university committees including her current participation in the Diversity Advisory Council, the President's Commission on Women's Issues, and the Provost's Work Life Committee. Her leadership in diversity was recognized twice while she was chair of Family Science when her department received the "Outstanding Academic Unit" award from the President's Commission on Ethnic and Minority Issues.


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No Picture Hyun Joon Kwon, Post Doc

Kinesiology

  hjk213@umd.edu



 

Jaslean LaTaillade Jaslean LaTaillade, Adjunct Professor

Family Science

1142G SPH Bldg.   jaslean@umd.edu

(301) 405-7574



Jaslean has a Ph.D., University of Washington, Clinical Psychology, 1999.

Her research focus is African American interracial couples and families, intimate partner violence, couple therapy, ethnic minority families

Click here to visit faculty web page

Sylvette A. LaTouche-Howard Sylvette A. LaTouche-Howard, Lecturer

Behavioral and Community Health

1101D SPH Bldg.   latouche@umd.edu

(301) 405-8292



Dr. Sylvette La Touche-Howard is the Department of Behavioral and Community Healths newest lecturer. She is a UMD School of Public Health alumna and graduated with her PhD in 2011. She was previously the Director of Public Health Initiatives at Bowie State Universitys Maryland Center. Her area of expertise is in mental health, health disparities, community engagement and program evaluation. She is a certified counselor and health education specialist.

Mei-Ling Lee Mei-Ling Ting Lee, Professor, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics; Affiliate in MIAEH

Epidemiology and Biostatistics | Maryland Institute for Applied Environmental Health

2234R SPH Bldg #255   mltlee@umd.edu

301-405-4581



Dr. Mei-Ling Ting Lee is Professor in the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics and Director of the Biostatistics and Risk Assessment Center (BRAC) at the University of Maryland, College Park. Dr. Lee's current research is focused in the following areas: (a) Statistical Methods for Genomic and Proteomic Data; (b) Threshold Regression Models for Risk Assessments: with Applications in Cancer, Environmental Research and Occupational Exposure; (c) Rank-based Nonparametric Tests for Correlated Data: with Applications in Epidemiology and Genomics; (d) Statistical Applications in Microbiology and Pharmacokinetics;(e) Multivariate Distributional Theory and Applications.

Dr. Lee holds Fellowship status in several international statistical organizations, including the American Statistical Association, the Institute of Mathematical Statistics, and the Royal Statistical Society. She was named the Mosteller Statistician of the Year in 2005 by the American Statistical Association, Boston Chapter. Dr. Lee has published a book on "Analysis of Microarray Gene Expression Data" and co-edited two other books. Dr. Lee is the founding editor and editor-in-chief of the international journal Lifetime Data Analysis, the only international statistical journal that is specialized in modeling time-to-event data. The journal is currently publishing the nineteenth's volume.

Click here to Dr. Mei-Ling Ting Lee's research webpage

Sunmin Lee Sunmin Lee, Associate Professor

Epidemiology and Biostatistics

2234C SPH Bldg.   sunmin@umd.edu

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(301) 405-7251



Dr. Sunmin Lee is a social epidemiologist with a main research interest in social determinants of health. She has expertise in health disparities, quantitative and qualitative research methods, community-based participatory research (CBPR), and cancer prevention and survivorship among Asian Americans.

Currently, she has three research projects: (1) Behavioral Intervention to Reduce Breast Cancer Disparity among Underserved Koreans (NCI/NIH); (2) Understanding Colorectal Cancer Screening among Chinese and Korean Americans (CDC); and (3) Lay Health Worker Model to Reduce Liver Cancer Disparities (NCI/NIH).

Dr. Sunmin Lee's homepage


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Leigh Leslie Leigh Leslie, Associate Professor

Family Science

1142V SPH Bldg.   lleslie@umd.edu

(301) 405-4011



Dr. Leslie focuses on gender issues, social support, and ethnic families. She has published six chapters and over 30 refereed articles in journals such as Journal of Marriage and the Family, Journal of Marital and Family Therapy, Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, and Journal of Family Psychology.

Click here to visit faculty web page

Rosemary Lindle Rosemary Lindle, Adjunct Faculty

Kinesiology

  rlindle@umd.edu

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301-405-2450



For the past 20 years, Dr. Lindle has been involved in the health and fitness field as an educator, researcher, and consultant. Currently, she is the health and wellness consultant to various government, corporate and non-profit agencies including the United States Secret Service (USSS), NAVY, United States Air Force (USAF), District of Columbia Fire and Emergency Medical Services (DCFEMS) , Montgomery County Fire and Rescue (MCFR), National Volunteer Fire Council (NVFC), Center for Disease Control (CDC), YMCA of the USA, and SportFIT Training Center.

She is also an adjunct faculty member in the Kinesiology Department, at the University of Maryland, School of Public Health, where she teaches a variety of exercise physiology courses. Her research focus has been in the areas of muscle physiology, biomechanics, and genetics. Her current reserach interests are in the area of occupational fitness of firefighters, law enforcement officers and the military.

Hongjie Liu Hongjie Liu, Associate Professor

Epidemiology and Biostatistics

2234A SPH Building   hliu1210@umd.edu

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(301) 405-3102



Dr. Liu is associate professor of Epidemiology in the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatisitcs, School of Public Health, University of Maryland, College Park. He graduated from UCLA School of Public Health in 2002, with a doctoral degree in Epidemiology.

His research focuses on social and behavioral aspects of HIV/AIDS and research methodology. In the past five years, his research projects mainly covered egocentric social and risk networks for HIV infection, sexual risks, non-injection and injection drug use, stigma, survey methodology (e.g., respondent-driven sampling), and advanced analytical techniques (structural equation modeling, actor-partner interdependent modeling, and psychometric analysis). Findings from his research have generated significant impacts as the identification of multi-faceted factors for HIV infection is highly likely to provide new targets for preventive interventions.

Dr. Liu has been actively and productively involved in research activities. Since 1997, he has participated, as a PI, Co-PI, or consultant, in 13 HIV-related studies in China and 6 studies in the United States. He has continuously received research funding from NIH (as PI on R03, R21, and R01 grants), the Foundation for AIDS Research (amfAR), the International Society for Infectious Diseases (ISID), the UCLA AIDS Institute, and other agencies. So far, Dr. Liu has authored a total of 66 peer-reviewed papers, including 47 publications (h-index: 18) in English journals and 19 in Chinese journals.

Tracey Manning Tracey Manning, Leadership Consultant and Adjunct Professor

Health Services Administration

3310 SPH Bldg.   tmanning@umd.edu

(410) 997-1728



Professional Experience: Tracey has specialized in assessing and developing transformational leadership and leadership self-efficacy, particularly with not-for-profit, higher education, and healthcare organizations, and with non-traditional (e.g. women, volunteers) and non-positional leaders (faculty, non-managers). She previously was Senior Scholar at the Burns Academy of Leadership, University of Maryland College Park, and Professor of Psychology at the College of Notre Dame of Maryland, now Notre Dame of Maryland University.

Research: Traceys research has centered on the relationships among attachment, civic engagement, work satisfaction, and transformational leadership, and has appeared in Women in Management Review, the American Psychologist, the Journal of Leadership and Organizational Studies, and the Journal of Leadership Education, along with several leadership books.

Community Service: After serving as program evaluator for the University of Marylands Legacy Leadership Institutes, Tracey initiated, helped to develop, and still co-coordinates, the Legacy Leadership Institute for the Environment in Howard County, now entering its seventh year of preparing age 50+ adults for high-impact volunteer roles in environmental organizations.

Catherine Maybury Catherine Maybury, Faculty Research Assistant

2367C SPH Bldg.   cmaybury@umd.edu

(301) 405-9437



Catherine is a recent graduate from the University of Maryland, School of Public Health. After a successful career in information technology, she pursued her interest in health promotion and disease prevention and received her MPH from the Behavioral and Community Health program. Her research interest is oral health literacy, especially its impact on health outcomes and interventions that can minimize the barriers presented by low oral health literacy. Her master's thesis investigated the health literacy of dentists relating to oral cancer prevention and early detection.


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Stephen McDaniel Stephen McDaniel, Associate Professor

Kinesiology

2337 SPH Bldg.   smcdanie@umd.edu

(301) 405-2499



Dr. McDaniel holds an affiliate appointment with the Department of Communication. His teaching and research are focused on marketing and media phenomena, in the area of sport management. He has presented his work to a number of academic groups including: The American Marketing Association, The Association for Consumer Research, The American Academy of Advertising, The Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, the North American Society for Sociology of Sport and the North American Society for Sport Management.

No Picture James McDevitt, Instructor, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts; Adjunct in MIAEH

Maryland Institute for Applied Environmental Health

  jmcdevit@hsph.harvard.edu

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(617) 432-0988



Dr. James J. McDevitt received his master's degree in Industrial Hygiene and PhD in Environmental Health Sciences from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore Maryland and completed a 3 year post-doctoral fellowship in Environmental Health Sciences at the Harvard School of Public Health. He is diplomat of the American Board of Industrial Hygiene. He has over 10 years of experience practicing industrial hygiene as an active duty member of the United States Air Force and in private consulting. He is currently an instructor at the Harvard School of Public Health and his research is focused on infections disease transmission and intervention.

Jack Meyer Jack A. Meyer, Professor of the Practice

Health Services Administration

  jmeyer@healthmanagement.com



Dr. Meyer has a joint appointment as Professor of the Practice in the School of Public Health and the School of Public Policy.

He is also a principal with Health Management Associates (HMA) in the Washington, D.C. office. In this capacity Dr. Meyer is conducting health care research, policy analysis, and strategic planning for grant-making foundations, health industry leaders, and state and federal agencies.

Shirley Micallef Shirley Micallef, Assistant Professor, Plant Science & Landscape Architecture, Affiliate in MIAEH

Maryland Institute for Applied Environmental Health

  smicall@umd.edu



Shirley A. Micallef received a B.Sc. and M.Sc. in plant biology from the University of Malta and a Ph.D. in microbial ecology from the University of Massachusetts Boston. She is currently an Assistant Professor in the Department of Plant Science and Landscape Architecture. Her main interests include the microbial ecology of bacteria in soil and how microorganisms interact with plants. Her current research is focusing on food safety of fruits and vegetables, specifically looking at Salmonella on pre-harvest tomatoes and using bacterial models to investigate possible means of contamination of crops with human pathogens residing in the environment.

No Picture Ross Miller, Assistant Professor

Kinesiology

2134A SPH Building   rosshm@umd.edu

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(301) 405-2495



Dr. Miller's research centers on how the neural, muscular, and skeletal systems interact to produce locomotion in health and pathology.


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Donald Milton Donald Milton, Professor and Director (MIAEH) & Professor, Epidemiology and Biostatistics, & Affiliate Cell Biology and Molecular Genetics, and the Maryland Pathogen Research Institute

Epidemiology and Biostatistics | Maryland Institute for Applied Environmental Health

2234V -- SPH Bldg #255   dmilton@umd.edu

(301) 405-0389



Dr. Milton earned a BS in Chemistry from the University of Maryland Baltimore County (Cum Laude), an MD from Johns Hopkins University and a DrPH (Environmental Health) from Harvard University. He trained in medicine at Emory and Boston Universities and Occupational and Environmental Medicine at Harvard. He previously served on the faculties of the Department of Environmental Health, Harvard School of Public Health and the Department of Work Environment, University of Massachusetts Lowell School of Health and Environment. He is currently Professor and Director of the Maryland Institute for Applied Environmental Health, University of Maryland School of Public Health, College Park, MD, Affiliate Professor of Medicine, University of Maryland, Adjunct Senior Lecturer on Occupational and Environmental Health at Harvard School of Public Health and Honorary Professor, Department of Community Medicine, University of Hong Kong. He is board certified in internal and occupational medicine and has 20 years of experience in occupational medicine referral practice. He teaches courses on environmental and occupational hygiene, aerobiology, toxicology, indoor air quality, respiratory epidemiology, physiology, pathology, pathophysiology. Dr. Milton is a past chair of the ACGIH Bioaerosols committee and a member of the committee since 1988. He a member of the editorial boards of Applied Environmental Microbiology, Indoor Air, and BMC Public Health. He is a recipient of the Lloyd Hyde Research Award of Emory University, the Harriet Hardy Award from the New England College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, and was elected a Fellow of the International Society for Indoor Air Quality and Climate in 2008.

Dr. Milton leads multidisciplinary investigations of the health effects of bioaerosols with three major themes: 1) the relationship of asthma onset and exacerbation to exposure to allergens and microbial products, 2) investigation and prevention of airborne infection transmission, and 3) exhaled breath analysis. His asthma research includes studies of occupational asthma and the impact of ambient bioaerosols on asthma exacerbation, especially the impact of low level, early life endotoxin exposure on the risk of childhood allergy and asthma. His research on mechanisms and prevention of airborne infection transmission includes productivity effects of rhinovirus colds in office workers and asthmatic children, mathematical models, and laboratory and epidemiological studies of control methods for influenza and agents of biological warfare and terrorism. Exhaled breath analysis is a unifying theme with ongoing work on exhaled gas and particle phase biomarkers for lung inflammation and studies of exhaled particles as the vehicle of airborne communicable disease transmission.

Click here to learn about the Got Flu? study and to join the 2012-13 influenza surveillance program.

Click here to see Dr. Milton's recent presentation on mechanisms of transmission of swine flu, given at the Institute of Medicine August 12, 2009.

Dr. Milton's Lab Webpage

No Picture Robert Mitkus, Computational Toxicologist, Office of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, USFDA, Rockville, MD; Adjunct in MIAEH

Maryland Institute for Applied Environmental Health

  robert.mitkus@fda.hhs.gov

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(301) 827-6083



 

Manouchehr Mokhtari Manouchehr Mokhtari, Associate Professor

Family Science

1142M SPH Bldg.   mokhtari@umd.edu

(301) 405-3299



Dr. Mokhtari's interests include economic transition, fiscal reform, applied econometrics: family economics, microeconomics of household behavior, microeconometric analysis of the Russian household behavior in transition to a market economy (Data Set: RLMS), reform in the Russian Federation (RF) and the Central Asian Republics (CARs). He teaches Research Methods,

Personal and Family Finance, and Family Economics.

Click here to visit faculty web page

Karoline Mortensen Karoline Mortensen, Assistant Professor

Health Services Administration

3310C SPH Building   karoline@umd.edu

(301) 405-6545



Karoline Mortensen is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Health Services Administration, School of Public Health, at the University of Maryland, College Park. She is also affiliated with AcademyHealth, the American Society of Health Economics, the Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management, the International Health Economics Association, the Maryland Population Research Center and the University of Maryland Prevention Research Center.

Dr. Mortensen's research interests are focused on health insurance and health care utilization of vulnerable populations, particularly utilization of Medicaid enrollees and the uninsured. She also explores health insurance transitions and the health status and health care utilization of Hurricane Katrina evacuees in Houston. Professor Mortensen's most recent research has been published in the journals Medical Care, Health Affairs, and the Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved. Dr. Mortensen is involved with several projects examining factors that affect health care utilization patterns of Medicaid enrollees. Current research and future projects explore the geographic variation in health care utilization in Medicaid, emergency department utilization, and the implications of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act on Medicaid enrollees and the uninsured. Her work on the effects of copayments and increases in physician reimbursement on health care utilization of preventive services of Medicaid enrollees is funded by the National Institutes of Health. Dr. Mortensen has experience with community partners, including Healthcare for the Homeless-Houston, the Mental Health Policy Analysis Collaborative in Houston, Dimensions Healthcare System, the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Prince George's County Health Department, and the University of Maryland Medical System. She teaches Introduction to Health Systems and Health Economics at the master's level, and Advanced Research Seminar and Health Services Portfolio at the doctoral level.

Raghuram Murtugudde Raghuram Murtugudde, Professor Atmostpheric and Oceanic Science; Affiliate in MIAEH

Maryland Institute for Applied Environmental Health

Erth Sys Sci 5825   mahatma@umd.edu

(301) 314-2622



Professor Murtugudde studies the effects of the ocean's microscopic floating plants, or phytoplankton. He has discovered that, in aggregate, phytoplankton produce enough heat to affect large-scale weather patterns. In work funded by NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, or NOAA, Murtugudde has discovered that climate models must take into account the effects of phytoplankton to predict El Niños and La Niñas. Recent work focuses on downscaling climate predictions to local scales needed for public health policy and environmental public health research. He is currently collaborating with Dr. Amir Sapkota on several projects.


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Noel Myricks Noel Myricks, Associate Professor Emeritus, Attorney-at-Law

Family Science

  nmyricks@umd.edu

(301) 405-4007



Dr. Myricks focuses on family law, children's legal rights, and mediation. He has published articles in such journals as American Journal of Family Law, Family Relations, American Bar Association Children's Legal Rights Journal, and National Organization on Legal Problems in Education.

Click here to visit faculty web page

Marcio Oliveira Marcio Oliveira, Assistant Dean for Educational Innovation

Office of the Dean

2242-C SPH Bldg.   marcio@umd.edu

(301) 405-2454



Dr. Oliveira's research seeks to characterize the developmental process of finger force control that aims to understand changes in the neuromechanical variables as motor control develops.

Ana Palla-Kane Ana Palla-Kane, Director of Undergraduate Programs

Kinesiology

2351 SPH Bldg   anapalla@umd.edu

(301) 405-2502



Dr. Palla-Kane is the Director of Undergraduate Programs in the Department of Kinesiology.

Dr. Palla-Kane is interested in disability studies, especially teachers training in the area of adapted physical activity and the development of strategies to have adapted programs accessible to individual with different types of disabilities.

She teaches KNES334: "Adapted Physical Activity: Empowering people with disabilities to lead a healthy and active lifestyle" to Undergraduate students in Kinesiology.

She has studied the impact of diversity in the delivery of quality physical education, and physical education teachers' perceptions and attitudes toward teaching students with disabilities and with culturally-diverse backgrounds.

Dr. Palla-Kane's dissertation "Adapted Physical Education Specialists perceptions of diversity issues in the delivery of Adapted Physical Education Services in California Urban Schools" was the first in the field of Adapted Physical Education to explore attitudes and experiences teachers toward students with diverse backgrounds.

No Picture Jennifer D Parker, Health Research Scientist, CDC/NCHS; Adjunct in MIAEH

Maryland Institute for Applied Environmental Health

Office of Analysis and Epidemiology, National Center for Health Statistics   jdparker@cdc.gov

(301) 458-4419



Dr. Parker is Health Research Scientist, Office of Analysis and Epidemiology, National Centers for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, based in Hyattsville, MD. She is a biostatistician with a strong interest in environmental health. Dr. Parker recently created new links between data sets maintained by the National Center for Health Statistics, including NHIS and NHANES, and air pollution data maintained by the EPA. Her work on air pollution health effects includes examination of impacts on asthma, cardiovascular disease, and reproductive health.

Typhanye Penniman Dyer Typhanye Penniman Dyer, Research Assistant Professor

Epidemiology and Biostatistics

2234FF SPH Building   typhanye@umd.edu

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(301) 405-8547



Dr. Penniman Dyer's research is in HIV/AIDS disparities, women's health, and substance use with an emphasis in social, psychological, and cultural determinants of racial/ethnic and gender disparities among marginalized populations, as well as their families. Her research in HIV/AIDS also examines substance use, mental health and sexual risk among Black men who have sex with men and women (MSMW), and how sex and drug risk networks of MSMW translates into risk for their female partners. Additionally, Dr. Penniman Dyer's research involves the examination of risk for females with high risk male sex partners and partners who have been incarcerated.

Dr. Penniman Dyer's research takes an interdisciplinary approach involving social epidemiology, health services research and community based research and has positioned her to expound upon findings from her research, which indicate a need for larger scale, population based studies that examine large networks, and subsequently to the development of policy aimed at reducing the burden of HIV for women and disenfranchised populations.

Dr. Penniman Dyer received her B.A. in Psychology from UCLA, her MPH from California State University, Long Beach and her PhD from the UCLA School of Public Health in Community Health Sciences. During her graduate studies, her work integrated social epidemiology, health services research, and community-based research to contribute to policy, interventions, and evidence-based practice.

The second aspect of her research was developed as a post-doctoral fellow at Johns Hopkins and involves the social context of drug and sexual risk behaviors. These studies have included an examination of the influence of concurrent sex and substance use networks on women's risk for infectious disease. Currently, Dr. Penniman Dyer is working on three studies as an HIV Prevention Trials Network (HPTN) Scholar, examining men who have sex with men (MSM) and men who have sex with men and women (MSMW) with respect to substance use, homophobia and mental health factors that increase risk.

This work will inform research, for which Dr. Penniman Dyer was recently awarded seed funding, that will explore risk perceptions and risk attributions for female partners of MSMW who have varied and often, concurrent sex and drug networks of unknown risk, which affects population health risks.

Currently, Dr. Penniman Dyer is on the research faculty within the department, working on several projects on mental health, and social and economic factors in HIV risk for Black men and women.


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Jennie Phillips Jennie Phillips, Lecturer/Advisor

Kinesiology

2318 SPH Bldg.   jenniep@umd.edu

(301) 405-3056



 

No Picture Catherine Ann Pickles, Administrative Assistant, Maryland Center for Health Equity

3302 SPH Building #255   cpickle2@umd.edu

(301) 405-8859



Cathy Pickles has over 15 years of administrative experience, including experience working for a medical residency program, a floral design training school and the U.S. Postal Service. The daughter of a career Public Health Service officer, she is passionate about being part of an organization working to address health care disparities.

No Picture Larry Plotkin, Adjunct Faculty

Kinesiology

  drlarryplotkin@gmail.com

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Barry Portnoy Barry Portnoy, College Park Professor

Behavioral and Community Health

2387 SPH Bldg.   bportno1@umd.edu

(301) 405-2463



Barry Portnoy, Ph.D. serves as Senior Advisor for Disease Prevention, Office of Disease Prevention (ODP), Office of the Director, National Institutes of Health. His current responsibilities include coordinating the NIH portion of Healthy People 2010 and stimulating collaborative prevention research projects. Prior to joining ODP Dr. Portnoy was with the National Cancer Institute (NCI), Division of Cancer Prevention. He also served as the NCI coordinator for the Department of Health and Human Services Healthy People 2000 and 2010 Objectives as well as serving on NIH's Prevention Coordinators Committee and the NIH Behavior and Social Science Coordinating Committee. He has held teaching appointments at the University of Virginia and the University of Maryland. He also served as an evaluation consultant to the National High Blood Pressure Education Program, the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal Disease, the Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion and the Department of Education. His research interests include the design and evaluation of chronic disease prevention and control interventions.

Robin Puett Robin Puett, Assistant Professor MIAEH and Assistant Professor Epidemiology and Biostatistics

Epidemiology and Biostatistics | Maryland Institute for Applied Environmental Health

2234EE -- SPH Bldg #255   rpuett@umd.edu

(301) 405-5610



Dr. Robin Puett was awarded an MPH in Behavioral Sciences from the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University and doctorates in Epidemiology and Environmental Health Sciences by the Arnold School of Public Health at the University of South Carolina. She completed post-doctoral training with the Department of Environmental Health at the Harvard School of Public Health and comes to MIAEH from the faculty of the University of South Carolina. Her research and teaching interests are in the areas of environmental and spatial exposure assessment and epidemiology. More specifically, much of her research has explored the relationship of ambient air pollution exposures with chronic disease (i.e. cardiovascular disease and diabetes) and mortality. Ongoing and future research in this area is targeted to examine additional health outcomes (e.g. cognitive impacts and breast cancer), the biological pathways involved, and important potential modifiers of these relationships, such as diet and physical activity. Her spatial exposure assessment, epidemiology and statistics work examines neighborhood contextual and built environment factors associated with physical activity, obesity, and chronic diseases. Health disparities is a cross-cutting issue addressed in her spatial and environmental research and teaching programs.


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Sandra Quinn Sandra Crouse Quinn, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs

Family Science | Office of the Dean

2242CC SPH Bld.   scquinn@umd.edu

(301) 405-8825



Dr. Quinn serves as the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, Professor in the Department of Family Science, and Associate Director of the Center for Health Equity at the School of Public Health, University of Maryland at College Park. As Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, Dr. Quinn is focused on strengthening academic programs and student services, building more links between undergraduate and graduate programs, and helping facilitate educational innovation and outstanding teaching in the UMD School of Public Health. Dr. Quinn is also is the Principal Investigator on Building Trust between Minorities and Researchers: A Bioethics Research Infrastructure Initiative funded by the National Center for Minority Health and Health Disparities (NCMHD), NIH and co-Principal Investigator on the Research Center of Excellence in Minority Health Disparities. Her research interests include engagement of minority and marginalized communities in research; community advisory boards; and risk communication in emergencies and disasters, with a particular focus on the implications for minority communities.

No Picture Dwayne Radcliff, Lecturer

Behavioral and Community Health

1224 SPH Bldg.   dradclif@umd.edu

(301) 405-3453



Dwayne Radcliff is a lecturer for the department of Behavioral and Community Health. He received his Masters of Public Health at the University of Maryland in 2002 and his Doctorate in 2008. He also currently works at the Labor and Employee Relations Branch of The U.S. Department of Health and Human Service.

Suzanne Randolph Suzanne Randolph, Retired Associate Professor

Family Science

1210B Marie Mount Hall   suzanner@umd.edu

(301) 405-4012



Suzanne M. Randolph, Ph.D., is a Retired Associate Professor of Family Studies at the University of Maryland, College Park. She is an African American scholar and her research interests include the normative development of African American infants, toddlers, and preschoolers. Dr. Randolph is currently CO-Project Director of the Head Start Violence Prevention Project at University of Maryland which is funded by the U.S. Department of Education. She is also a CO-Investigator on two other major studies: the Temple University site of the National Study of Early Child Care funded by NICHD and the Johns Hopkins University study "The Ecology of African American Children's Development" funded by the USDHHS/Maternal and Child Health.

No Picture Bonnie Richter, Senior Epidemiologist, Department of Energy (DOE); Affiliate in MIAEH

Maryland Institute for Applied Environmental Health

  Bonnie.Richter@hq.doe.gov

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(301) 903-4501



Dr. Bonnie S. Richter is the senior epidemiologist at the U.S. Department of Energy. She has been at the Department since 1990 and served as the Director of the Office of Illness and Injury Prevention, 2003-2007. Dr. Richter's professional training is in occupational and environmental epidemiology. She received her A.B. (biology) from Clark University, Worcester, MA, earned an M.P.H. from the University of Michigan School of Public Health, and received a Ph.D. in epidemiology from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Hygiene and Public Health. Dr. Richter provides the technical expertise for an illness and injury surveillance system of DOE workers, and has conducted epidemiologic studies among workers, as well as residents of communities near DOE sites, potentially exposed to chemical or radionuclides. Trained as a virologist, she is also responsible for pandemic planning for the Department. She has taught epidemiologic methods to diverse audiences, from graduate students to community groups. She currently represents DOE on the National BioDefense Science Board, and a CDC Advisory Board on environmental health. Dr. Richter served on the President's Task Force on Environmental Health and Safety Risks to Children, the Federal Interagency Working Group on Women's Health and the Environment, and the National Children's Study Chemical Exposure Group. Prior to joining DOE, Dr. Richter worked for the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta.

Marc Rogers Marc A. Rogers, Associate Professor

Kinesiology

2140 SPH Bldg.   mrogers1@umd.edu

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(301) 405-2484



Trained as an exercise physiologist, Dr. Rogers' research interests are the effects of aging on skeletal muscle structure, function and metabolism. Dr. Rogers is currently the Human Subjects' Liaison for the Department of Kinesiology with the Institutional Review Board at the University. He can be contacted with questions about the process of human subjects review of research projects in the department.


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No Picture Andrea Romeo, Instructor

Kinesiology

2330 SPH Building   aromeo@umd.edu

(301)405-8962



Andrea Romeo is an alumna of the Kinesiology program at the University of Maryland, College Park. She loves sports, especiall the Terps. She is in her 5th year as the assistant field hockey coach at Broadneck High School. Andrea is also an advisor in the department.

Stephen Roth Stephen M. Roth, Associate Professor, Associate Chair & Graduate Director

Kinesiology

2351F SPH Bldg.   sroth1@umd.edu

(301) 405-2504



Dr. Roth's areas of interest include understanding the role of genetic variation (and environmental interaction) in determining inter-individual differences in exercise responses, skeletal muscle traits, and other health-related phenotypes; as well as understanding the role of exercise/physical activity in modifying DNA structure (e.g., telomere length, DNA methylation). He directs the Functional Genomics Laboratory.

Kevin Roy Kevin Roy, Assistant Professor

Family Science

1142T SPH Bldg.   kroy@umd.edu

(301) 405-6348



Ph.D., Human Development and Social Policy, Northwestern University, 1999.

Research Focus:Men in low-income families, parents caregiving and providing roles, social policy, qualitative methods

Click here to visit faculty web page

Roger Rubin Roger Rubin, Associate Professor Emeritus

Family Science

  rrubin@umd.edu

(301) 405-4004



Dr. Rubin has a Ph.D., Child Development and Family Relationships. His research focus is family policies, contemporary family forms, mental health issues, and African American family life.

He has published numerous articles in such journals as Adolescence, Family Issues, Family Relations, National Journal of Sociology, and American Journal of Family Law.

Click here to visit faculty web page

Brit Saksvig Brit I. Saksvig, Research Assistant Professor

Epidemiology and Biostatistics

2234N SPH Bldg.   bsaksvig@umd.edu

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(301) 405-2491



Brit I. Saksvig, Ph.D., M.H.S. is a Research Assistant Professor. Dr. Saksvig received her masters and doctorate degrees from the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health. Her research interests focus on dietary and physical activity behaviors and their association with the prevention of chronic disease. Dr. Saksvig's primary interest is in developing and evaluating school and community-based interventions for children and adolescents.

Dr. Saksvig is the MPH Internship Coordinator and Graduate Director for the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics.


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Amir Sapkota Amir Sapkota, Assistant Professor MIAEH & Assistant Professor Epidemiology and Biostatistics

Epidemiology and Biostatistics | Maryland Institute for Applied Environmental Health

2234F -- SPH Bldg #255   amirsap@umd.edu

(301) 405-8716



Dr. Amir Sapkota holds a joint appointment at the Maryland Institute for Applied Environmental Health and the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics. Dr. Sapkota received his PhD in Environmental Health Sciences from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and his BS in Chemistry from Clark University. He joins the growing number of faculty at UMCP after successfully completing post-doctoral work at the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) in Lyon, France.

Understanding exposures that occur among individuals and identifying markers of cellular responses that can predict the development of future diseases enables public health practitioners to identify specific subpopulations at risk, who subsequently can be targeted with proper interventions to prevent such disease occurrence. Within this framework, Dr. Sapkota's primary research interests lie in the area of exposure assessment and environmental epidemiology. He is interested in utilizing personal air measurements, as well as urinary and serum biomarkers to understand the risk of diseases associated with exposures to various air pollutants such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), in the environment and at the workplace. At UMCP, Dr. Sapkota will work on a range of topics including the inner city environment and asthma; impacts of traffic on community air pollution; and indoor air pollution from solid fuel usage in developing countries and risk of lung cancer, to name a few.

Researcher ID:

Amy Sapkota Amy R Sapkota, Associate Professor MIAEH and Associate Professor in Epidemiology and Biostatistics

Epidemiology and Biostatistics | Maryland Institute for Applied Environmental Health

2234P -- SPH Bldg #255   ars@umd.edu

(301) 405-1772



Dr. Amy R. Sapkota has a joint appointment with the Maryland Institute for Applied Environmental Health and the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics. She received a PhD in Environmental Health Sciences from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, an MPH in Environmental Health Sciences from the Yale School of Public Health and a BS in Biology from the University of Maryland, College Park. Dr. Sapkota also holds a Certificate in Risk Sciences and Public Policy, and completed post-doctoral fellowships at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and the Environmental Microbial Genomics Group within Le Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique in Lyon, France.

Dr. Sapkota's research interests lie in the areas of environmental microbiology, exposure assessment and environmental epidemiology, with a focus on evaluating the complex relationships between the environment, food and water production systems, and human infectious diseases. Current research projects include: 1) evaluating changes in bacterial antibiotic resistance as large-scale poultry farms transition to organic practices; 2) investigating the prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in tertiary-treated wastewater used for spray irrigation; 3) evaluating environmental and socioeconomic disparities in the risk of food and waterborne illness; and 4) utilizing next-generation sequencing methods to identify the bacterial communities present in cigarettes, smokeless tobacco products and environmental tobacco smoke. Other areas of interest include the human health impacts associated with exposures to bacterial pathogens prevalent in the Chesapeake Bay.

Robin Sawyer Robin Sawyer, Associate Professor

Behavioral and Community Health

2368 SPH Bldg.   sawyer@umd.edu

(301) 405-2517



I currently hold the position of Associate Chairperson for the Department of Behavioral and Community Health. My major research interest is adolescent (particularly college student) sexuality, focusing on sexually transmitted diseases, unintended pregnancy and sexual violence. I am currently working a great deal with intercollegiate athletes in the area of sexual violence. In addition I have a major interest in media development and have written and produced four sexuality films.

No Picture Christine Schull, Adjunct Professor

Family Science

1142CC SPH Bldg.   bschulleod@aol.com

(301) 405-6344



Christine Schull is a Lecturer in the Department of Family Science.

Marvin Scott Marvin Scott, Instructor

Kinesiology

2347 SPH Bldg.   mwscott@umd.edu

(301) 405-2480



Dr. Scott has been on the faculty in the Department of Kinesiology at the University of Maryland, College Park for the past sixteen years. He serves as an instructor and as the Coordinator of the Kinesiological Science program in the Department of Kinesiology. Dr. Scott has presented at local, state, regional and national AAHPERD conventions. In addition he has presented at the Black Faculty and Staff Association Conference at the University of Maryland and at the American Association of University Women annual conference.


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Elliot Segal Elliot A Segal, Professor of the Practice

Health Services Administration

  globalgti@aol.com

(301) 652-5001



He currently heads the Healthy Futures Program at the University of Maryland School of Public Health. The primary mission of the Healthy Futures Program is to combat obesity, particularly among low income young children and their families in Prince George's County. He has spent his career in health care delivery, policy and finance in both the public and private sectors. His Congressional activities have led to several new laws and regulations. His previous teaching included 26 years at Yale University in topics including health policy, health care services, health planning and financing. He is currently President and CEO of GTM LLC, a health consulting firm. He holds a M.UrS and MPH from Yale University and a BA from Brandeis University.

Katherine Sharp Katherine Sharp, Graduate Program Coordinator/Instructor

Behavioral and Community Health

2387B SPH Building   ksharp1@umd.edu

(301) 405-2464



As the Graduate Program Coordinator for the Department of Behavioral and Community Health, Dr. Sharp oversees admissions, and assists current students with their program plans and other advising needs.

As the co-chair of the Faculty, Staff and Students subcommittee, Dr. Sharp plays an integral role in achieving and maintaining CEPH accreditation for the Department of Behavioral and Community Health and for the school as a whole.

Dr. Sharp also teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in the department, serves on several department and school-wide committees, and maintains research interests in the areas of health literacy, health communication/risk communication strategies, women's health, and stress management.

Edmond Shenassa Edmond Shenassa, Associate Professor, Director of Maternal and Child Health; Affiliate in Epidemiology and Biostatistics

Epidemiology and Biostatistics | Family Science

1142GG SPH Bldg.   shenassa@umd.edu

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(301) 405-3658



Shenassa's research is primarily focused on families' mental and physical well-being with an emphasis on two general areas: the developmental consequences of prenatal and perinatal exposure to toxins and social disparities in health with a focus on the role of housing and other built environments. As an epidemiologist, Shenassa's work is informed by the fields of sociology and psychology and aims to address questions that can improve public health interventions or shape policy and regulation. His focus on the built environment, particularly housing conditions, is motivated by the potential to reduce health disparities through existing local and federal housing policies.

Click here to visit faculty web page

Jae Kun Shim Jae Kun Shim, Assistant Professor

Kinesiology

0110F SPH Bldg.   jkshim@umd.edu

(301) 405-2492



Our research is currently focused on biomechanics and motor control of (1) hand and digits and (2) persons with lower extremity amputations as well as their applications to medicine, rehabilitation, and ergonomics. We are especially interested in understanding the CNS control mechanism for motor redundancy, developments of motor functions in typically developing children as well as children with developmental coordination disorder, developmental changes and intervention & adaptation of motor functions in elderly persons and the persons with neurological/genetic disorders or stroke, and physiological and biomechanical risk and interventions of persons with lower extremity amputations. We use techniques of biomechanics, motor control, neurophysiology, and exercise physiology: kinematic analysis using motion capture systems, kinetic/dynamic analysis, neuromuscular training, TMS, EMG, MEG, MRI, optic fiber Bragg grading (FBG) force sensors, 6-D kinetic pen, cardiovascular exercise, neuromuscular training, epidemiology, etc.

Lori Simon-Rusinowitz Lori Simon-Rusinowitz, Associate Professor, Graduate Director

Health Services Administration

3310D SPH Bldg .   lasr@umd.edu

(301) 405-2548



Lori Simon-Rusinowitz, M.P.H., Ph.D., is an Associate Professor at the University of Maryland Department of Health Services Administration and Center on Aging. Since 1995, she has served as Research Director for the Cash and Counseling Demonstration and Evaluation (CCDE), the Next Steps replication project, and the National Resource Center on Participant-Directed Services.. She is an Associate Professor at the University of Maryland in the Center on Aging and the School of Public Health, Department of Health Services Administration. Her research focus has been in the field of aging and disability policy issues for the past 25 years. Among her responsibilities as Research Director for the CCDE, Dr. Simon-Rusinowitz has overseen a three-part study of consumers' preferences for consumer-directed personal care as well as other components of the Demonstration and Evaluation. She has led numerous policy implementation studies addressing topics such as: a policy option to hire family caregivers, including a study examining policymakers views about this issue; consumer-directed services for older consumers and their caregivers; workforce issues for personal care workers in consumer-directed and traditional agency settings; training representatives for consumers with dementia in consumer-directed services; and an environmental scan of behavioral health and self-direction. She has published and presented extensively on these topics. Her responsibilities in the Department of Health Services Administration include teaching courses in Health Policy and Politics, Qualitative Research Methods, Professional Writing and Communications, and coordinating the Internship Program.

Prior to joining the University of Maryland, Dr. Simon-Rusinowitz held positions at the George Washington University National Health Policy Forum and The Gerontological Society of America. She earned a Ph.D. in Health Policy at the University of Illinois at Chicago and an M.P.H. from the University of Michigan.


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J Carson Smith J Carson Smith, Assistant Professor

Kinesiology

2146 SPH Bldg.   carson@umd.edu

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(301) 405-0344



Dr. Smith is focused on understanding how exercise and physical activity affect human brain function and mental health. Dr. Smith's investigations use magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and electroencephalography (EEG) to examine brain function in people at risk for Alzheimer's disease. Dr. Smith, his team of investigators, and collaborators are interested in the potential efficacy for exercise to affect brain function and memory in healthy older adults at genetic risk for Alzheimer's disease, as well as in patients diagnosed with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI). The ultimate goal is to provide evidence for exercise to delay conversion to Alzheimer's disease and protect against age-related cognitive decline. In addition, Dr. Smith examines how acute and chronic exercise or physical activity may alter emotional reactivity, attention allocation, and cognitive function among patients with anxiety and/or depressive mood disorders.

Visit http://www.exerciseforbrainhealth.com/ for more info.

Nancy Smith Nancy Smith, Lecturer

Behavioral and Community Health

2377 SPH Bldg.   nsmith10@umd.edu

(301) 405-2463



Nancy Smith has an M.A. in health education and a Ph.D. in Behavioral and Community Health, both from the University of Maryland. She served as a researcher/evaluator for over 25 years, working largely for Washington D.C. area consulting firms on contracts for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Now, back at the University of Maryland she is a lecturer, bringing her practical experience to her teaching. Dr. Smith teaches Principles of Community Health II, a pre-professional skill-building course designed to help undergraduate majors transition into the public and community health workforce, and to develop professional competencies, among which includes proposal writing.

Espen Spangenburg Espen Spangenburg, Associate Professor

Kinesiology

2134A SPH Bldg.   espen@umd.edu

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(301) 405-2483



The primary goal of Dr. Spangenburg's NIH-funded laboratory is to understand the influence of sex steroids on molecular and cellular mechanisms that regulate skeletal muscle, hepatic, and adipose tissue function. In particular, the laboratory emphasis is focused on defining cellular signaling mechanisms that are altered by sex steroids that influence metabolic function.

Damion Thomas Damion Thomas, Assistant Professor

Kinesiology

2136 SPH Bldg.   thomas@umd.edu

(301) 405-2450



Dr. Damion is a member of the Physical Cultural Studies Research Group in the Department of Kinesiology. For more information see the Physical Cultural Studies website.

Stephen Thomas Stephen B. Thomas, Professor & Director

Health Services Administration

3302E SPH Building   sbt@umd.edu

(301) 405-8357



Stephen B. Thomas, PhD, is professor of Health Services Administration in the School of Public Health and Director of the University of Maryland Center for Health Equity at the University of Maryland in College Park. One of the nation's leading scholars in the effort to eliminate racial and ethnic health disparities, Dr. Thomas has applied his expertise to address a variety of conditions from which minorities generally face far poorer outcomes, including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, obesity and HIV/AIDS. He is principal investigator of the Research Center of Excellence on Minority Health Disparities, funded by the NIH-National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities. He is also principal investigator, with Dr. Sandra Quinn, of the NIH National Bioethics Infrastructure Initiative: Building Trust Between Minorities and Researchers awarded in 2009. For information please visit the Maryland Center for Health Equity website: http://www.healthequity.umd.edu/buildingtrust_bio_thomas.asp"


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No Picture Kerry Tripp, Adjunct Professor

Family Science

  ktripp@umd.edu



 

Paul Turner Paul Turner, Assistant Professor MIAEH and Assistant Professor Epidemiology and Biostatistics

Epidemiology and Biostatistics | Maryland Institute for Applied Environmental Health

Room 2234J   pturner3@umd.edu

(301) 405-6583



Dr Paul C Turner is a new tenure track faculty within the Maryland Institute for Applied and Environmental Health; having recently left the Molecular Epidemiology Unit, University of Leeds, UK. Dr Turner obtained his PhD in Chemistry at the University of Edinburgh, UK, and his undergraduate BSc with honors in Biochemistry and Toxicology at the University of Surrey, UK. He was also a visiting scientist at Johns Hopkins University in 2003 and 2005.

Dr Turner's research interests include understanding (1) the role of fungal toxins (mycotoxins) in chronic disease etiology, (2) establishing intervention strategies to restrict such exposures. Mycotoxins, which include the Aspergillus toxins aflatoxin and ochratoxin A, and the Fusarium toxins deoxynivalenol and fumonisin, contaminate up to 25% of the world's food supply. They are suspected agents in both acute and chronic disease. Aflatoxins are potent liver toxins and carcinogens, and are additionally suspected to cause growth faltering and immune-suppression. Four billion people are estimated to live in regions that are at risk of dietary exposure to aflatoxin. Fundamental research question include (a) understanding synergistic interactions between aflatoxin and hepatitis virus in liver cancer risk; (b) understanding the mechanism(s) of observational data on dose related aflatoxin growth faltering; (c) understanding the potential contribution that aflatoxin plays in early life morbidity and mortality in developing countries, including modulations in susceptibility to infections; (d) development and implementation of sustainable interventions to restrict exposure in the most vulnerable groups; (e) understanding of global climate change models and their impact on changing world patterns and levels of toxin exposure.

Fusarium mycotoxins have been implicated in esophageal cancer, though their potential role remains poorly explored. Deoxynivalenol, also known as vomitoxin, modulates the immune system and is associated with growth faltering in animals. Fumonsins have been linked to neural tube defects, and are a suspected co-risk factor in aflatoxin driven liver cancer. The recent development of an exposure biomarker for DON and a strong candidate for fumonisin provides the opportunity to better understand their potential role in human chronic disease, and better inform intervention strategies.

No Picture Dennis F. Vacante , Instructor, Adjunct Faculty

Kinesiology

  dvacante@umd.edu

301-864-7589



Dennis Vacante, NBCT/CAPE is a National Board Certified Teacher/Certified in Adapted Physical Education. He is also a Regional Itinerant Liaison for Adapted Physical Education for Prince George's County Public School system. He has taught Adapted Physical Education for 37 years. He worked 28 years teaching elementary students who have orthopedic impairments. He presently works with high school students who have intellectual disabilities and with elementary students who have autism spectrum disorders. Besides teaching the Adapted Physical Education course (Knes-333) Dennis is the coordinator of the Children's Developmental Clinic which services 75-85 children with various disabilities in the areas of motor development, language, social skills, and reading. Students interested in volunteering for the clinic which runs each Saturday morning in the School of Public Health Building can find more information on our website: http://www.sph.umd.edu/KNES/cdc/

The Children's Developmental Clinic will begin spring training in the matted gym (ground floor of School of Public Health Bldg.) at 8:30 am on Saturday, February 1, 2014 (casual dress for participation in lively fun activities). Clinic will run every Saturday morning through April 26th, with no Clinic on March 22nd during spring break. Clinician volunteers will gain experiential knowledge, learning how to work with children with disabilities. Students can also receive college credit for this service/study experience. Every clinician receives a free tee shirt and a certificate verifying volunteer service hours. Most of all, each volunteer will experience the satisfaction of helping a child who has special needs.

No Picture Kimberly Van Putten-Gardner, Adjunct Professor

Family Science

  kvanputt@umd.edu



 

Jacqueline Wallen Jacqueline Wallen, Associate Professor

Family Science

1142R SPH Bldg.   jwallen@umd.edu

(301) 405-4008



Dr. Wallen studies women and substance abuse treatment; treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder; adoption; the evaluation of foster-child services, and work-family programs.

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Min Qi Wang Min Qi Wang, Professor

Behavioral and Community Health

2373 SPH Bldg.   mqw@umd.edu

(301) 405-6652



I am currently National Environmental Public Health Tracking Program for Maryland. The major goal of this project is to identify Maryland-specific data on environmental hazards, exposures to environmental hazards, health outcomes thought to be related to environmental factors. I am also working on the Maryland Exchange Network Water Quality Exchange. The major goal of this project is to build state multi-agency communications by sharing environmental health data.

Carol Werlinich Carol Werlinich, Instructor, Director of the Family Service Center

Family Science

1142BB SPH Bldg.   cwerlin@umd.edu

(301) 405-4017



Dr. Werlinich studies family therapy, domestic violence, and families of murdered children. She is the principal investigator of a study of the experiences and coping strategies of mothers of murdered children and the implications for therapists.

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No Picture Kantahyanee Whitt-Murray, Lecturer

Behavioral and Community Health

SPH Bldg.   kwhitt@umd.edu

(301) 405-3453



Kantahyanee is a lecturer for the Department of Behavioral and Community Health.

Laura Wilson Laura Wilson, Professor Emerita, Health Services Administration

Health Services Administration

3310F SPH Bldg   lwilson@umd.edu

(301) 405-2470



Laura Wilson was the founding chair for the Department of Health Services Administration and the Director of the Center on Aging. She also directed RSVP International and the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at the University of Maryland.

Sacoby Wilson Sacoby Wilson, Assistant Professor MIAEH & Assistant Professor Epidemiology and Biostatistics

Epidemiology and Biostatistics | Maryland Institute for Applied Environmental Health

2234D -- SPH Bldg #255   swilson2@umd.edu

(301) 405-3136



Dr. Wilson's research focuses on environmental justice, environmental health, environmental health disparities, built environment, air pollution monitoring, including the use of passive samplers and semi-continuous monitors, community-based participatory research (CBPR) and community-owned and managed research (COMR). He trained in secondary data analysis, advanced geographic information systems and spatial methods, and other quantitative and qualitative approaches. He has extensive experience performing monitoring of air pollution in neighborhoods located near industrial hog operations and the use of spatiotemporal mapping for human exposure assessment. Dr. Wilson received his PhD and MS degree in environmental health from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He is a two-time EPA STAR fellow, Senior Fellow in the Environmental Leadership Program, and past Chair of the Environment Section of the American Public Health Association.

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Faika  Zanjani Faika Zanjani, Associate Profesor

Behavioral and Community Health

  fzanjani@umd.edu



Dr. Faika Zanjani is an associate professor in the Department of Behavioral and Community Health. Dr. Zanjani comes to the University of Maryland from the University of Kentucky College of Public Health, where she was an assistant professor at the Graduate Center for Gerontology and had secondary appointments in Health Behaviors and Psychiatry. Some of Dr. Zanjanis recent research has focused on mental health and substance use issues affecting older adults.

Tracy Zeeger Tracy Zeeger, Lecturer

Behavioral and Community Health

1224 SPH Bldg.   tzeeger@umd.edu



Tracy Zeeger is a lecturer in the Department of Behavioral and Community Health. She currently teaches Principles of Community Health II. In addition to her teaching responsibilities, Tracy is an advisor for current majors and those students who are interested in changing their major to Community Health.

No Picture Robyn Zeiger, Adjunct Professor

Family Science

  rzeiger@umd.edu



 

Jo Zimmerman Jo Zimmerman, Instructor

Kinesiology

2316 SPH Building   jzimmer1@umd.edu

301.405.2498



Jo Zimmerman is an instructor in the Department of Kinesiology. She earned her undergraduate and master's degrees from George Mason University, and has held the ACSM Health Fitness Specialist certification since 1996. Jo has been working in the health and fitness industry for nearly 20 years and teaching for over 14 years.

UMD courses vary by semester, but may include KNES 157N/O, KNES 161N, KNES 200, KNES 350, KNES 332, and KNES 497.

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